No One Knows For Sure Why The Eye’s Lens Changes As We Age, Forming Cataracts.

In fact, the risk for vegans was roughly 40 percent lower than for the high meat eaters. As it slowly progresses, the streaks extend to the canter and interfere with light passing through the canter of the lens. Your eye may be sensitive to light and touch. If a part of the lens becomes opaque light does not pass through easily and the patient’s vision becomes blurry – like looking through cloudy water or a fogged-up window. no dataLong-term use of steroid medications, too, can cause cataracts to develop. In the highest risk group of patients, the incidence of pseudophakic retinal detachment may be as high as 20%. 45 46 The risk of endophthalmitis occurring after surgery is less than one in 1000. 47 Corneal enema and cystoid macular enema are less serious but more common, and occur because of persistent swelling at the front of the eye in corneal enema or back of the eye in cystoid macular enema. 48 They are normally the result of excessive inflammation following surgery, and in both cases, patients may notice blurred, foggy vision. Direct medical costs for cataract treatment are estimated at $6.8 billion annually. 56 In the eastern Mediterranean region, cataracts are responsible for over 51% of blindness. http://experteyedoc.macsverige.org/2016/12/05/uncovering-elementary-solutions-in-glaucoma/No one knows for sure why the eye’s lens changes as we age, forming cataracts. Cataracts tend to “grow” slowly, so vision gets worse gradually.

Julian Nussbaum during a visit Dec. 27 to the Eye Care Center at AU Medical Center. I dont want to sound alarmist, the 74 year-old from Clearwater, S.C., begins, but I think my eyes might last longer than I do. Well, thats my job, Nussbaum said, chuckling. After battling diabetes for nearly 40 years, Lowe has developed diabetic retinopathy, a consequence of uncontrolled diabetes that can damage small blood vessels in the eye and is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. A researcher across campus from the clinic is looking at a different way of potentially blocking the inflammation that can lead to that damage through a potential new drug. Dr. Shruti Sharma of the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine has a $1.5 million grant from the National Eye Institute to look at basic research into blocking inflammation among epithelial cells in light-sensing retina in the eye, Sharma is looking at a well-known agent in inflammation called interleukin-6 that can affect those cells even though they lack the receptor normally needed for such interaction, an effect called trans-signaling. While that effect had been known for a while it is not something that researchers had focused on in the past, she said. Sharma is looking at an experimental drug that in her early work seems to have blocked that type of action in those cells, using it both in the lab in human cells in the same kind of environment that is there in the eye and in a mouse model of diabetes. The hope is to prevent the barrier disruption to the cells that can cause them to become leaky and create inflammation, an early hallmark of the disease.

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